(Source: colbornes, via bananapoleon)

fourfeathersonegoal:

It’s called sudden death over time because as soon as it starts I suddenly want to die.

(via sohumangousbig)

erikkarlsson65:

Milo Greene “Silent Way” if you feel stressed out take a listen, brillant

Literally my favorite part of following Erik Karlsson on Tumblr has been the music recommendations. I am terrible at finding music for myself and rely entirely on people cooler than I am. Which is apparently Erik Karlsson.

shadesfire:

got bored and decided I needed one of my favorite Welcome to Night Vale tweets as a cross stitch

shadesfire:

got bored and decided I needed one of my favorite Welcome to Night Vale tweets as a cross stitch

(via sohumangousbig)

tastefullyoffensive:

[mrlovenstein] (hidden panel)

paulmartinamericanhero:

4.17.14: Patrick Kane catches the camera watching him during his pre-game stretch.

UGH, you’re the worst.

(via sohumangousbig)

kidshade:

ediebrit:

IM FUCKING SCREAMING

IM IN FUCKING STITCHES 

(via saintawesome)

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

(Source: melanskyyworld, via cayday)

puckling:

thecoggs:

puckling:

Our intrepid leader. 

I like things that confirm my belief that Tazer spends a lot of time at the Apple Genius Bar being like “BUT HOW DO I RECORD VIDEO? WHAT’S A SNAPCHAT? WHY ARE MY WORDS SPELLED WRONG?”

Headcanon accepted. 

(Source: clarkethesharkmacarthur, via saintawesome)

Talking with Ehrlinger, we were reminded of something Hewlett-Packard discovered several years ago, when it was trying to figure out how to get more women into top management positions. A review of personnel records found that women working at HP applied for a promotion only when they believed they met 100 percent of the qualifications listed for the job. Men were happy to apply when they thought they could meet 60 percent of the job requirements. At HP, and in study after study, the data confirm what we instinctively know. Underqualified and underprepared men don’t think twice about leaning in. Overqualified and overprepared, too many women still hold back. Women feel confident only when they are perfect. Or practically perfect.

The Confidence Gap”, Katty Kay and Claire Shipman

how real is this article? too fucking real.

(via bropunzeling)

(via bananapoleon)

puckling:

svmadelyn:

twoearsandaheart:

twoearsandaheart:


2010 Stanley Cup Champions

how is this just now coming to tumblr-light??

Ok, probably someone else has done the exact same thing, but I followed this and the jonny-yells-at-iPod gifs back to their source and the reason fandom’s never seen them is that THEY DIDN’T EXIST. She just posted them, and they’re from footage she worked with as a summer intern with Hockey Hall of Fame. SO EVERYONE CAN STOP BEING DISAPPOINTED IN FANDOM. And everyone can start imagining what ELSE lies in the deep dark closets of that hallowed institution, just waiting to be unearthed.

I went to check that out too, because I was like - have I been in a vacuum for four years? A SECRET VACUUM? Bless this intern for bringing the images to the people. There are videos that it sounds like that the NHL is going to be posting that she edited.

Alright, everyone is rehired, I’m sorry, I spoke in anger.
THANK YOU INTERN GIF-MAKER FOR BRINGING GOODNESS TO THE PEOPLE, YOU ARE A TRUE GIVER. 

puckling:

svmadelyn:

twoearsandaheart:

twoearsandaheart:

2010 Stanley Cup Champions

how is this just now coming to tumblr-light??

Ok, probably someone else has done the exact same thing, but I followed this and the jonny-yells-at-iPod gifs back to their source and the reason fandom’s never seen them is that THEY DIDN’T EXIST. She just posted them, and they’re from footage she worked with as a summer intern with Hockey Hall of Fame. SO EVERYONE CAN STOP BEING DISAPPOINTED IN FANDOM. And everyone can start imagining what ELSE lies in the deep dark closets of that hallowed institution, just waiting to be unearthed.

I went to check that out too, because I was like - have I been in a vacuum for four years? A SECRET VACUUM? Bless this intern for bringing the images to the people. There are videos that it sounds like that the NHL is going to be posting that she edited.

Alright, everyone is rehired, I’m sorry, I spoke in anger.

THANK YOU INTERN GIF-MAKER FOR BRINGING GOODNESS TO THE PEOPLE, YOU ARE A TRUE GIVER. 

(Source: clarkethesharkmacarthur)

(Source: http, via cayday)

garaks:

#THIS IS FUCKING UNNECESSARY WOW

When I was little this was my favorite movie. I watched it until I broke the video tape. Now that I’m older, in my 20s, and my mom has passed away, I think about all the times I watched it as a kid and think maybe mom was preparing me to live without her someday - that at the back of my mind, there was always the thought that the pain of losing her would be crushing and awful but I could survive, find a better place with the help of friends.

And yeah, the thought of this movie still makes me tear up.

(via sohumangousbig)

The camera, as it does, spun directly to Liverpool’s captain after the final whistle blew. He closed his eyes, and then covered them with his arm, like you would if you were, say, playing peekaboo, but when he pulled his arm back, he wasn’t sticking his tongue out and making a face — he was in tears. Wait, he’s crying, I thought. Wait, why is he crying? A brief pause, and Wait … I’m crying, too? WAIT, WHY ARE WE BOTH CRYING? IT’S NOT EVEN 7:30 YET. The last one’s a ridiculous question in one sense: I’ve been a Liverpool fan for as long as I could watch (almost) every game on TV. Which means I’ve considered getting Gerrard’s face tattooed on pretty much every part of my body. He’s been this voyeuristic constant — someone I’ll never meet, someone I’ll never be able to do anything for, but someone who’s dictated my emotions more consistently than maybe any other individual over the past decade. I’ve graduated high school and college, moved across the country, had busted relationships, lost touch with old friends, and spent a night in Oklahoma, but all the while, Steven Gerrard’s been playing for Liverpool. Of course I’m gonna cry.